WerewolfReported This is a featured page


A WerewolfIn Greek Myth, Lycaos was the extraordinarily cruel king of Arcadia. Lycaos sought favor with Zeus by offering him the flesh of a young child. Enraged, Zeus turned Lycaos into a wolf. The belief that certain people can turn themselves into animals, especially wolves, and roam the earth doing evil became widespread.

The word "werewolf" means "manwolf" since wer is the Saxon word for man. Werewolves love to eat babies and corpses. silver bullets or arrows are not the only thing that can kill a werewolf. After death, a werewolf resumes his human identity.

In the Middle Ages, many Europeans believed wolves were tools of the devil and the animals were ruthlessly hunted. Epileptics and the mentally ill were often brought to court and accused of being werewolves. Today, psychologists use the term "lycanthrope" to describe a mentally ill person who actually believes he has been changed into an animal.

European culturesWerewolves lose in the streets


Many European countries and cultures influenced by them have stories of werewolves, including Albania (oik), France (loup-garou), Greece (lycanthropos), Spain (hombre lobo), Mexico (hombre lobo and nahual), Bulgaria (varkolak), Turkey (kurtadam), Czech Republic/Slovakia (vlkodlak), Serbia/Montenegro/Bosnia (vukodlak, вукодлак), Russia (vourdalak, оборотень), Ukraine (vovkulak(a), vurdalak(a), vovkun, перевертень), Croatia (vukodlak), Poland (wilkołak), Romania (vârcolac, priculici), Macedonia (vrkolak), Scotland (werewolf, wulver), England (werewolf), Ireland (faoladh or conriocht), Germany (Werwolf), the Netherlands (weerwolf), Denmark/Sweden/Norway (Varulv), Norway/Iceland (kveld-ulf, varúlfur), Galicia (lobisón), Portugal/ (lobisomem), Lithuania (vilkolakis and vilkatlakis), Latvia (vilkatis and vilkacis), Andorra/Catalonia (home llop), Hungary (Vérfarkas and Farkasember), Estonia (libahunt), Finland (ihmissusi and vironsusi), and Italy (lupo mannaro). In northern Europe, there are also tales about people changing into animals including bears, as well as wolves.Legend states that a full moon was capable of inducing an involuntary metemorphosis.

Werewolves in European tradition were sometimes innocent folk suffering from the witchcraft of others, or simply from an unhappy fate, and who, as wolves, behaved in a truly touching fashion, adoring and protecting their human benefactors. In Marie de France's poem Bisclavret (c. 1200), the nobleman Bizuneh, for reasons not described in the lai, had to transform into a wolf every week. When his treacherous wife stole his clothing needed to restore his human form, he escaped the king's wolf hunt by imploring the king for mercy and accompanied the king thereafter. His behaviour at court was so much gentler than when his wife and her new husband appeared at court, that his hateful attack on the couple was deemed justly motivated, and the truth was revealed. Other tales of this sort include William and the Werewolf (translated from French into English ca. 1350), and the German fairy tales Märchen, in which several aristocrats temporarily transform into beasts. See Snow White and Rose Red, where the tame bear is really a bewitched prince, and The Golden Bird where the talking fox is also a man.

The legends of ulfhednar mentioned in Vatnsdœla saga, Haraldskvæði, and the Völsunga saga resemble some werewolf legends. The ulfhednar were fighters similar to the berserkers, who were dressed in bear hides and reputed to channel the spirits of these animals to enhance effectiveness in battle. These warriors were resistant to pain and killed viciously in battle, much like wild animals. Ulfhednar and berserkers are closely associated with the Norse god Odin.

In Latvian folklore, a vilkacis was someone who transformed into a wolf-like monster, which could be benevolent at times. Another collection of stories concern the skin-walkers. The vilkacis and skin-walkers probably have a common origin in Proto-Indo-European society, where a class of young unwed warriors were apparently associated with wolves.

According to the first dictionary of modern Serbian language (published by Vuk Stefanović-Karadžić in 1818) vukodlak / вукодлак (werewolf) and vampir / вампир (vampire) are synonyms, meaning a man who returns from his grave for purposes of fornicating with his widow. The dictionary states this to be a common folk tale. Common amongst the Kashubs, and the Serbs and Slovenes of what is now northern Poland, was the belief that if a child was born with hair, a birthmark or a caul on their head, they were supposed to possess shape-shifting abilities. Though capable of turning into any animal they wished, it was commonly believed that such people preferred to turn into a wolf.

According to Armenian lore, there are women who, in consequence of deadly sins, are condemned to spend seven years in wolf form. In a typical account, a condemned woman is visited by a wolfskin-toting spirit, who orders her to wear the skin, which causes her to acquire frightful cravings for human flesh soon after. With her better nature overcome, the she-wolf devours each of her own children, then her relatives' children in order of relationship, and finally the children of strangers. She wanders only at night, with doors and locks springing open at her approach. When morning arrives, she reverts to human form and removes her wolfskin. The transformation is generally said to be involuntary, but there are alternate versions involving voluntary metamorphosis, where the women can transform at will.

The 11th Century Russian Prince Vseslav of Polotsk was considered to have been a Werewolf, capable of moving at supehuman speeds, as recounted in The Tale of Igor's Campaign: "Vseslav the prince judged men; as prince, he ruled towns; but at night he prowled in the guise of a wolf. From Kiev, prowling, he reached, before the cocks crew, Tmutorokan. The path of Great Sun, as a wolf, prowling, he crossed. For him in Polotsk they rang for matins early at St. Sophia the bells; but he heard the ringing in Kiev."

There were numerous reports of werewolf attacks—and consequent court trials—in sixteenth century France. In some of the cases there was clear evidence against the accused of murder and cannibalism, but none of association with wolves; in other cases people have been extremly terrified by such creatures, such as that of Gilles Garnier in Dole in 1573, there was clear evidence against some wolf but none against the accused. The loup-garou eventually ceased to be regarded as a dangerous heretic and reverted to the pre-Christian notion of a "man-wolf-fiend." The lubins or lupins were usually female and shy in contrast to the aggressive loup-garous. Some French werewolf lore is based on documented events caused by the full moon. The Beast of Gévaudan terrorized the general area of the former province of Gévaudan, now called Lozère, in south-central France. From the years 1764 to 1767, an unknown entity killed upwards of 80 men, women, and children. The creature was described as a giant wolf by the sole survivor of the attacks, which ceased after several wolves were killed in the area.

Wolves were still found in England as late as 1600, they have been also seen the movies of many of werewolf theories, but became extinct by 1680. At the beginning of the seventeenth century witchcraft was prosecuted by James I of England, who regarded "warwoolfes" as victims of delusion induced by "a natural superabundance of melancholic."


World folklore


Common Turkic folklore holds a different, reverential light to the werewolf legends in that Turkic Central Asian shamans, after performing long and arduous rites, would voluntarily be able to transform into the humanoid Kurtadam (literally meaning "Wolfmen"). Since the wolf was the totemic ancestor animal of the Turkic peoples, they would be respectful of any shaman who was in such a form.

In popular belief of Ethiopian highlands, similar to the werewolf folklore, is the myth of people being able to transform into hyenas through exposure to a curse or explicit association with the devil. Though not linked to the presence of a full moon or any other seasonal event, the myth has it that those people often perform the transformation at will and often at night. The subjects are closely associated with the phenomenon of the evil eye ("Buda" in Amharic) popular in the province of Gojjam.

In the Caribbean island of Trinidad, there is a common belief that a creature called a lagahoo exists. It is described as a male shape-shifter, and is often spotted in the villages.

Signs of a werewolf

If you have a friend that acts strangely during a full moon watch out for these signs of a werewolf.
1. If you happen to be in the same room as the suspect on the night of a full moon watch what they are doing if they start to pace and prowl about the room as the sun goes down be careful if they start to walk on all fours.
2. Werewolves know they are dangerous and try to get family and friends away if the suspect begs you to leave.
3. In the hours before they change werewolves gain acute hearing, animal strength, and a hightened sense of smell.
4. Look at the fingernails werewolves have reddish almond shaped nails and may have a nail as hard as the claw of a wolf on their left thumb.
5. Werewolves have very broad hands also look at the third finger if it is unusually long watch out!
6. Being a werewolf is exhasting so they are pale and tired looking the day after a full moon
7. Werewolves are also very thirsty after a full moon.
8. Werewolves have long swinging strides like that of a prowling wolf.
9. Finally a not very helpful russian tip- look under the tounge of the suspect to see if it has bristles.


Characteristics

Becoming a werewolfWhen transformed there is a huge question whether the transformee retains rational thought or become primal.


Historical legends describe a wide variety of methods for becoming a werewolf, one of the simplest being the removal of clothing and putting on a belt made of wolfskin, probably as a substitute for the assumption of an entire animal skin (which also is frequently described). In other cases, the body is rubbed with a magic salve. To drink water out of the footprint of the animal in question or to drink from certain enchanted streams were also considered effectual modes of accomplishing metamorphosis. Olaus Magnus says that the Livonian werewolves were initiated by draining a cup of specially prepared beer and repeating a set formula. Ralston in his Songs of the Russian People gives the form of incantation still familiar in Russia. According to Russian lore, a child born on December 24 shall be a werewolf. Folklore and literature also depict that a werewolf can be spawned from two werewolf parents.

In Galician, Portuguese, and Brazilian folklore, it is the seventh of the sons (but sometimes the seventh child, a boy, after a line of six daughters) who becomes a werewolf (Lobisomem). In Portugal, the seventh daughter is supposed to become a witch and the seventh son a werewolf; the seventh son often gets the Christian name "Bento" (Portuguese form of "Benedict", meaning "blessed") as this is believed to prevent him from becoming a werewolf later in life. In Brazil, the seventh daughter become a headless (replaced with fire) horse called "Mula-sem-cabeça" (Headless Mule). The belief in the curse of the seventh son was so widespread in Northern Argentina (where the werewolf is called the lobizón), that seventh sons were frequently abandoned, ceded in adoption, or killed. A 1920 law decreed that the President of Argentina is the official godfather of every seventh son. Thus, the State gives a seventh son one gold medal in his baptism and a scholarship until his twenty first year. This effectively ended the abandonments, but there still persists a tradition in which the President godfathers seventh sons.

In other cases, the transformation was supposedly accomplished by Satanic allegiance for the most loathsome ends, often for the sake of sating a craving for human flesh. "The werewolves", writes Richard Verstegan (Restitution of Decayed Intelligence, 1628), "are certayne sorcerers, who having annoynted their bodies with an ointment which they make by the instinct of the devil, and putting on a certayne inchaunted girdle, does not only unto the view of others seem as wolves, but to their own thinking have both the shape and nature of wolves, so long as they wear the said girdle. And they do dispose themselves as very wolves, in worrying and killing, and most of humane creatures." Such were the views about lycanthropy current throughout the continent of Europe when Verstegan wrote.

The power of transforming others into wild beasts was attributed not only to malignant sorcerers, but to Christian saints as well. Omnes angeli, boni et Mali, ex virtute naturali habent potestatem transmutandi corpora nostra ("All angels, good and bad have the power of transmutating our bodies") was the dictum of St. Thomas Aquinas. St. Patrick was said to have transformed the Welsh king Vereticus into a wolf; St. Natalis supposedly cursed an illustrious Irish family whose members were each doomed to be a wolf for seven years. In other tales the divine agency is even more direct, while in Russia, again, men are supposedly become werewolves when incurring the wrath of the Devil.

A notable exception to the association of Lycanthropy and the Devil, comes from a rare and lesser known account of a man named Thiess. In 1692, in Jurgenburg, Livonia, Thiess testified under oath that he and other Werewolves were the Hounds of God. He claimed they were warriors who went down into hell to do battle with witches and demons. Their efforts ensured that the Devil and his minions did not carry off the abundance of the earth down to hell. Thiess was steadfast in his assertions, claiming that Werewolves in Germany and Russia also did battle with the devil's minions in their own versions of hell, and insisted that when werewolves died, their souls were welcomed into heaven as reward for their service. Thiess was ultimately sentenced to ten lashes for Idolacy and superstitious belief.

A distinction is often made between voluntary and involuntary werewolves. The former are generally thought to have made a pact, usually with the Devil, and morph into werewolves at night to indulge in mischievous acts. Involuntary werewolves, on the other hand, are werewolves by an accident of birth or health. In some cultures, individuals born during a new moon or suffering from epilepsy were considered likely to be werewolves.

Long ago some people that were sick got hallusionations. Some of these people acted strange, almost animal like. They were considered werewolves, the "evil spirit" possesing them really just fever. Some of them found a cure for this, which really only cured their illness. Others weren't as lucky and, before they cured their fever, were killed by either other people who believed they were monsterous animals, or the illness.

Vulnerabilities


Werewolves have several described weaknesses, the most common being an aversion to wolfsbane (a plant that supposedly sprouted from weeds watered by the drool of Cerberus while he was brought out of the Underworld by Heracles). Unlike vampires, werewolves are not harmed by religious artifacts such as crucifixes and holy water.

Various methods have existed for removing the werewolf form. The simplest method was the act of the enchanter (operating either on oneself or on a victim), and another was the removal of the animal belt or skin. To kneel in one spot for a hundred years, to be reproached with being a werewolf, to be struck three blows on the forehead with a knife, or to have at least three drops of blood drawn have also been mentioned as possible cures. Many European folk tales include throwing an iron object over or at the werewolf, to make it reveal its human form, naked in cases from 1859.

Another vulnerability is to use a weapon of pure silver (bullet, knife ect). To stab a werewolf with a silver dagger, or to shoot it with a silver bullet is said to not only kill a werewolf, but to also cause it agony in the time before it dies, rather resembling being slowly burned from the inside.

Becoming a werewolf simply by being bitten by another werewolf as a form of contagion is common in modern horror fiction, but this kind of transmission is rare in legend, along with another form of this being "licked" by a werewolf to turn one's self (in this case the person is continuously a werewolf but has total control over the form, and has no blood lust, but gains increased strength and agility). Also it is hereditary, meaning you can be born a werewolf in women they do not bring their change into view until after they have mated with a male werewolf, but the boys are born into it.



Added Info On Werewolves



Becoming a Werewolf and Metamorphosis Theories Before the ways someone can become a werewolf are examined, it is important to know that there are two metamorphosis theories concerning werewolves. In other words, there are two different theories as to how werewolves turn into their wolf-forms. They have been labeled the "non-material" and "material" metamorphosis theories:

Non-Material
This theory is the more popular of the two, as it creates a bigger fear-factor than the material theory. In the non-material theory, a werewolf is forced to change by the light of a full moon. As to whether or not a werewolf needs to be in the light of the full moon in order to change is dependant on the imagination of the storyteller.
Material
This theory requires shapeshifters to have an enchanted belt, garter or wolf-skin that, when worn, transforms the shapeshifters into werewolves. An example of this is book eight of The Saga of the Volsungs in which Sigmund and Sinfjotli steal two wolf-skins from sleeping werewolves and try them on (Saga 44). In order to return to their true forms, Sigmund and Sinfjotli waited in the forest until they were able to remove them -- there is no specification as to how long they waited (45).
When werewolves change into his or her lupine form, there is one seemingly over-looked aspect: what about the clothes that the werewolves wore before shapeshifting? Since werewolves are more beast-like than human, it would be folly to wear an article of clothing that would give away the werewolves' human identities. Thus, sensible werewolves would remove their clothes, not only to give them something to wear when they return to their human forms but to also prevent a non-werewolf from recognizing them (see below for ways this is accomplished). Dramatic werewolves, on the other hand, would shapeshift while wearing their clothes and rip the fabric into pieces. Clothes that werewolves remove prior to shapeshifting turns into stone at the time that they shapeshift according to lore, and then returns to its normal fabric properties when the owner of the clothes returns to them and regains their former shape (Baring-Gould 7).

Changing Back from Wolf-Form

In The Essential Guide to Werewolf Literature, Brian J. Frost describes several ways that a werewolf may return to his or her human form, and each requires human thought to perform. The first way he suggests is for a werewolf to dive into water, or roll in the grass - specifically, the dew. Both of these methods require water, which is the element that shapeshifting is commonly associated with as water takes on the form of the container in which it is placed into. The second method that Frost suggests is for a werewolf "to kneel in one spot for a hundred years" (Frost 10). This method requires a werewolf to first move to a location that will not be disturbed by any hunters or accidentally stumbled upon. It also requires a werewolf to pick a spot with easy access to food and water within reach, since he or she must be stationary the whole time. A third theory that is presented by the media in movies is that werewolves automatically change back to their form when the time is up - both when the sun rises, and when they are killed. Please view the "How to Kill a Werewolf" page for more information here.

Now, How to Become a Werewolf:

Werewolves have a vast variety of ways to turn into one. Each method of acquiring the gift/curse has its own advantages and disadvantages. I have rated the following methods in the following categories: Accessability (how easy is it to perform this method?), Discoverability (how easy is it for someone to discover the werewolf’s little secret?), Sensibility (is it even possible?) and Overall. The following methods were taken from Brian J. Frost's The Essential Guide to Werewolf Literature, pages seven to eleven.

Method: Drinking water from a wolf’s pawprint
Type: Non-Material
Description: To turn into a werewolf with this method, find a werewolf’s pawprint that has been filled with rain and drink from it.
Origin: Middle Ages
Marci’s Opinion: Considering the environment of that particular era as well as today’s, this could possibly be one of the unsanitary methods. Plus, this method is pretty ambiguous - how fresh does the wolf’s pawprint have to be? What if someone drinks from a half-wolf’s paw print? What if you drink the rainwater through a straw? How much do you need to drink? Since gravity also pulls water downward, the chance of finding a pawprint with water still in it are pretty slim.
Accessability
Discoverability
Sensibility
Overall
A person would have to live in an area with wolves in order for this method to work. The only chance of someone being caught drinking from the ground is if he or she is with someone, or if that particular person just so happens to have bad karma and get interrupted. Since this is a non-material method, acquiring it would have the highest chance of being found out. The only other opportunity to loose the secret is if the person is attacked in wolf’s form, or is seen while changing shape. Water. From a pawprint. This method is a bit far-fetched, and finding a way to make sure water stays in the pawprint would be difficult, as making a plaster imprint of the paw while shaping it like a bowl can be considered cheating, even though it would make drinking from it easier. Overall, 2/5 – there’s just too many questions raised by this method to work.

Method: Eating wolf brains.
Type: Material
Description: Self explanatory: eat the brains of a wolf.
Origin: Middle Ages.
Marci’s Opinion: Also called "the zombie method," this is a highly revolting and disgusting method to use to become a werewolf. I believe that the brains are meant to be eaten raw, as it is more feral than cooking it as a "civilized" person would.


Method: "Sleeping on the ground in an open field on a Friday night when the moon is full" (9)
Type: Non-Material
Description: Self-explanatory - simply go outside (preferably on a clear night) and fall asleep out in a field. It can be assumed that the person who attempts this method cannot bring any human comforts such as a pillow or tent, although the position as to whether or not a person needs to go skyclad is debatable.
Origin: Middle Ages
Marci’s Opinion: Full moons are often associated with werewolves, and in the book Dracula wolves are called "the children of the night," so this method so far makes sense (18) However, I believe that this method is to be used with another method: the werewolf’s bite.
Accessability
Discoverability
Sensibility
Overall
It’s easy to go outside and fall asleep - if you enjoy the outdoors and have a relatively remote place, as falling asleep in a baseball field in a neighborhood is likely to get curious people wondering if you’re a mis-placed corpse, thus interrupting your night’s sleep. High if you’re doing this in a neighborhood; low if you’re out in the country. If a person enjoys the outdoors and the weather is warm, then this method should be looked into by those who wish to become a werewolf. Otherwise, it may just result in an uncomfortable night outside. Overall, 2/5 - just falling asleep doesn’t sound as if it would do it.

Method: "Drinking from a lycanthropous stream" (9)
Type: Material
Description: Find a lycanthropous stream and drink from it. It can be assumed that the person is to lap out water from this stream in order to be more feral and take on more wolf-like qualities, however it is unknown.
Origin: Middle Ages
Marci’s Opinion: What makes a lycanthropous stream? A stream frequented by werewolves and/or wolves? A stream that has a dead werewolf in it at the bottom? A stream that looks like a ribbon of silver at night? Finding a stream that fits this criteria would be difficult, as it would require asking others about the location of the stream, any odd histories of the streams, and a lot of research to track one down. It would be wise to check upstream with this sort of method, just to be aware of what a soon-to-be werewolf is going to be drinking. Really, you'd have better luck finding a wandering gypsy and asked to be cursed.
Accessability
Discoverability
Sensibility
Overall
Low if you don’t have a stream like this nearby; high if you do. If you don’t know of such a stream, a seeker would set off a lot of warnings and may attract unwanted attention because of this. This method is a bit unsanitary - boiling the water is out of the question, as you may boil away the factor that turns people into werewolves! Overall, 2/5. Water is associated with shapeshifting, so it would make sense in order to drink it in order to become one.

Method: Wearing certain flowers
Type: Material
Description: There are specific flowers that, when worn, can cause the wearer of them to turn into a werewolf. Wolfsbane is not one of them, as these flowers ward off werewolves.
Origin: Middle Ages
Marci’s Opinion: A flower to induce shape-shifting? It seems as the "certain flowers" would give its wearer more delusions than actually turning them as the legend suggests.
Accessability
Discoverability
Sensibility
Overall
It’s unknown which flowers make a werewolf - once this is discovered, accessability would depend on a person’s location, the season, and if the nearby flowershop has it in stock. Low - people may just notice the werewolf in human disguise wearing a flower and think nothing of it. A flower. There are MUCH better methods out there that sound better than wearing a flower, and sound better when bragged about. This is ranked at 1/5 - the flower would seem to give off more delusions than be an actual shape-changing item. The advantage of this is a low discovery factor.

Method: Wearing a magical ointment
Type: Material
Description: Simply rub on a special lotion, and turn into a werewolf!
Origin: Unknown
Marci’s Opinion: This method reminds me of the "suntan in a bottle" projects that, in the end, just make the wearer look silly. On the other hand, someone who’s really good at making lotions can create an easy scam by ripping off werewolf fans with a fake product like this that gives the appearance of fur.
Accessability
Discoverability
Sensibility
Overall
A person would need to find someone who would be willing to make this, as well as having all the ingredients on hand. This sounds like something that the yellowpages and Google won’t be able to help out with. Along with finding someone to make it, a person might also have to buy the seller's silence along with the product. A person’s word can be bought as well, for the right price... How fast does the lotion work? If it worked quickly, then a person using this product would have to slather it on their body quickly, as well as be very flexible in order to cover the entire back. This method is given a 1/5 as it seems difficult to acquire and use. On top of that, unless a person learns to make it, they would have to rely on another person who could quite possibly double-cross them. Learning to make it may sound more appealing, however a Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde complex may develop as a result. Use with caution.

Method: Wearing a wolf’s skin/belt/garter
Type: Material
Description: A person can change into a wolf by donning one of these three, magically specified items.
Origin: The Vikings (Beserkers)
Marci’s Opinion: Of all the methods so far, this one sounds plausible - there’s several stories concerning garments that change people into animals, such as the story with the seven swan sisters who had robes made out of swan’s feathers that enabled them to become swans. There is also the magical race called the "selkies" who were seal-women and changed in and out of their forms by donning/discarding a garment made from seal-skin.
Accessability
Discoverability
Sensibility
Overall
Varies. While getting a wolf’s pelt may be easy to obtain from a crazy hunter, the belt and garter must be made from a wolf’s pelt. Each of these items must also be magically charged. Unless a person lives with another person who enjoys digging through the shapeshifter's things, or is struck by a robber who accidentally stumbles across one of these items hidden away in their sock drawer, being discovered is low. That is, unless, someone obtains a search warrant and ransacks the place and unearths it. To avoid awkward situations and unwanted questions, it is recommended to hide this item in plain sight. This method makes sense, considering the amount of other, similar stories of people turning into animals and back again through the use of a garment. A popular example of this is in book eight of The Saga of the Volsungs. I rate this method at being 4/5, as the only obstacle with this method is acquiring one of these magically-charged garments.


Method: Werewolf’s Bite
Type: Non-Material
Description: Simply get bit by a werewolf.
Origin: Unknown
Marci’s Opinion: The most popular of all werewolf-transformation myths, this bite requires the person wishing to turn into one to first track down a werewolf and entice the werewolf to bite him or her... And only bite, not maim or disembowl. The popular media uses this method the most, as it is the most dramatic.
Accessability:
Discoverability
Sensibility
Overall:
This requires tracking down a werewolf, or convincing a friend who’s a werewolf to bite and only bite you. A few questions may be asked about the latest wound, so creativity is needed to come up with a good enough excuse. Getting bit is pretty painful - and if werewolf folklore is true, and werewolves have no rationality... Getting just bit and keeping the limb that was just bit may pose some problems. Overall, this method has many risks. Since it is the most popular, it can be assumed that this method would be the best one that would work, and earns a 4/5.


Method: A Pact with the Devil
Type: Material
Description: Summon the devil and make a deal - it’s not as if you use your soul daily, right?
Origin: Unknown.
Marci’s Opinion: This method, while appearing the most ideal (trading something you don’t use for something you can) has its advantages and disadvantages like the others. One keen question that is raised is the validity and guarantee of the wolf-form you’ll receive in exchange. Will you have control? How long can you wear the form for? How do you get in/out of the form?
Accessability
Discoverability
Sensibility
Overall
This requires knowledge in the "heretic" and "dark" arts, as well as a place that a person is the least likely to be interrupted in. Depends on the length of time it takes to summon the devil, and how much dramatics he/she/it uses when he/she/it appears and how much attention that brings. Those with religious upbringing and faith may seem horrified at this method. To others, it’s too strange to even consider. Only the serious should attempt this. Overall, I rate this 2/5. Wolves are seen by many as evil creatures, so it seems fitting that a stereotypical dark force should have control over them. Oh, be sure to read the fine print -- in many stories where someone makes a deal with the devil, the person who signs the contract usually gets cheated because of the nearly invisible print.


Method: Family Curse
Type: Non-Material
Description: Being a werewolf is passed down from generation to generation.
Origin: Unknown.
Marci’s Opinion: This method views being able to change into a wolf as a disease that is hereditary. This is also a popular method, since it is easy to do and useful for modern media screenplay writers to explain why Character X is a werewolf without having to waste some of the film’s budget and film on a flashback sequence.
Accessability
Discoverability
Sensibility
Overall
In order to use this method, your family needs to have a history of this. Marrying into a werewolf-family won’t work, unless you are attempting to try the bite method, in which case you would have easier access to a werewolf. Slim, unless a member of the family was caught and convicted as a werewolf, in which case the whole family would be either placed under watch or tried as well. This method seems plausible, providing that being a werewolf is more of an STD than a curse. This method earns a 2/5, as it is for family-members only.. And even then, it’s for the "special" children who are (un)lucky enough to receive the gene necessary to enable transformation.



Logic_Chair
Logic_Chair
Latest page update: made by Logic_Chair , Nov 4 2011, 4:07 PM EDT (about this update About This Update Logic_Chair Prove it. - Logic_Chair

9 words deleted

view changes

- complete history)
Keyword tags: werewolf
More Info: links to this page
Started By Thread Subject Replies Last Post
beliver123 im looking for a real werewolf/lycan to change me (page: 1 2 3 4 5 ... last page) 258 Aug 29 2014, 9:58 PM EDT by Tolonkolo
Thread started: Aug 14 2012, 1:35 PM EDT  Watch
hey guys im looking for a real werewolf to turn me plz in the uk
15  out of 27 found this valuable. Do you?    
Keyword tags: werewolf werewolves
Show Last Reply
Anonymous werewolfs (page: 1 2) 21 Aug 19 2014, 9:17 PM EDT by M.i.b.s
 
Thread started: Jul 26 2011, 10:21 PM EDT  Watch
i am a born werewolf no doubt
3  out of 8 found this valuable. Do you?    
Keyword tags: werewolf
Show Last Reply
WolvesInTheDark Wolf Therians?? (page: 1 2) 38 Aug 6 2014, 7:01 PM EDT by M.i.b.s
Thread started: Jun 21 2010, 9:03 AM EDT  Watch
Maybe perhaps an off shoot of werewolves are wolf therians.
Therians are people who have the SPIRIT of an animal (it could be any animal even mythical ones but those are called Otherkin)
It depends on the therian how much it can 'shift' but as I have found out, only a small percent of the population and do a full physical shift. You know, into a wolf and everything. But it is rather commonplace to see a therian (for the full full moon cycle ((which are 3 days))) get rather acute hearing, a sharper sense of smell, and yearning to run, feed, and/or mate, and they grow faster. A big pointer to spot a shifting therian is looking at their feet. If they start walking on their toes without thinking about it is a kick start to a shift.

Your safety isn't at stake unless they are in a full mental shift (all of the human mind processes are stopped. They are basically a wolf with a human body) but then unless you are absolutely stupid- they probably aren't going to attack you. It's like dealing with an animals- if you don't go around its territory, offspring, or antagonize them, you're fine most of the time. You aren't going to be stalked on most likely, but if a small child is in the area it might be a good idea to get the kid out of there.

But your safety is at stake if it is fully physically shifted. IT IS AN ANIMAL at that point.
What to do: Don't let fear get to you. DON'T LET IT SHOW. Back away slowly, and don't show your back. Don't look at it in they eye and don't run.
If you know someone who can fully shift- you probably know more therians. Go tell them, and they will know what to do.

But I noticed how similar the werewolf and the wolf therian can be...Any ihput?
3  out of 3 found this valuable. Do you?    
Keyword tags: werewolf
Show Last Reply
Showing 3 of 94 threads for this page - view all

Related Content

  (what's this?Related ContentThanks to keyword tags, links to related pages and threads are added to the bottom of your pages. Up to 15 links are shown, determined by matching tags and by how recently the content was updated; keeping the most current at the top. Share your feedback on WikiFoundry Central.)